A pair of notes is delivered to Fort Chesbrook Springs on the 20th. They are nearly identical, both addressed in the same script and sealed with dark red wax, pressed with Evangline Baptiste's personal seal.

The first is to be delivered to the lord of the house.

Tarran-

Much as I would like to think that our work on this cure drawing to a close would mean more time to spend with you, it seems that is not to be the case. You remember my friend Lily, come over from Tuneric to help us with things? She's taken ill, at this late stage. It's bad - not as bad as you were, but nearly. What worries me most is that it's not following what I would expect. She has moments of lucidity, has been able to sit up and drink on her own, but she's also spent much of her time hallucinating. She's already sworn that her dead brother and the lover she left back home have been in the room with us. I do not doubt that she'll recover, but it's...I'm not sure how long it will take.

I will admit that I'm finding it hard to keep from blaming myself. I saw the signs a few days ago, but she swore it was just fatigue, and I didn't want to second-guess her as if she were a child. If I had, perhaps we could have caught this sooner. Perhaps No. I can't let myself think like that. I'm sorry, it's been a long day. I haven't left Lily's room since the maids heard her in a screaming delirium this morning. Tomorrow my mother will take over watch so that I can rest; I won't allow myself to get worn too thin.

Hopefully next time I write there will be better news.

All my love,
Eva
The second letter is to be delivered into the hands of Captain William Remington, if he is within the bounds of Fort Chesbrook, or sent on to his location if he is not.

Captain Remington,

I write to you to inform you of the condition of your countrywoman, Lady Liliana Gyrtner. In the course of her work assisting with the manufacture of the plague cure, she has contracted the illness herself. It incapacitated her this morning, and we immediately began a full course of medications to combat it. Please be assured that she's being carefully monitored and tended, and we are doing our utmost to bring her back to health as quickly as possible.

While I am confident she will recover, I am not sure what impact her illness will have on your departure. I will not let her travel before she is sufficiently recovered, for reasons that I hope are obvious, and I cannot give even an estimate as to when that will be. It is, of course, up to you and your fellow travelers how you choose to proceed; I am certain arrangements can be made for her trip back to Tuneric, if you do not wish your return to be delayed. If it is helpful in making your decision, I can keep you abreast of her condition via letter, or indeed you are welcome to South Huntswalk where either I or my mother can give you a more detailed picture.

I apologize for the nature of the news. I have also written to Lady Nolana to inform her of the situation, although regrettably the time it takes for a letter to travel will make the news more bitter for her, I fear. At your convenience, please let me know how you wish to proceed.

Sincerely,
Lady Evangeline Baptiste
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@Tarran Hutchinson @William Remington